Go Big!

The Big CountrynA Workshop Productionnby Chris BarlownDirected by Morgan GouldnnJuly 21-30, 2011nThursday-Saturday @ 8pmnSaturday @ 2pmnnAdmission: $5 cash, paid at door.nTo reserve a seat email Barb at Theatre@www.tschreiber.orgnnWinner of the 2011 New Works Project. The Big Country combines the Great American Play with the Great American PowerPoint Presentation to finally explain those bizarre alien creatures known colloquially as Human Beings.n

Get all the latest Interstellar transmissions

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“Like” Us!nfacebook.com/itsabigcountry

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“Follow” Us!ntwitter.com/austinbabbish

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Fulfill A Fall Resolution

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Last Chance to Audition for  

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The 2011-2012 One-Year Conservatory

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September 19th-May 20th, 2011

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Monday-Friday 9:00am-1:30pm  

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There are only TWO spots still available. 

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For more information,  please call 212-741-0209, email us at info@www.tschreiber.org

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“The One Year Conservatory has changed my life professionally and personally. After studying at previous acting programs in the city I know and feel that there is no program quite like it.  I have never worked with such incredibly passionate, challenging and encouraging teachers in a supportive and sage environment. The changes and progress that have happened collectively and individually since beginning the program are just extraordinary.”  – Stephanie I. 2010-11, One Year Conservatory Actor    

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Application Requirements

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–  Interview/Audition

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(For Appointment Call 212-741-0209)

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– Two Letters of Recommendation

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– Picture & Resume

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– $75 Application Fee

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Sneak A Peek…

 

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SAM CHRISTENSEN IMAGE INTENSIVE

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*Free Preview Class*

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   Thursday, August 4th 8-10 pm 

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Call Today to Register

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(212) 741-0209

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Both of Sam Christensen’s Upcoming Intensives Are Full, But It Is Not Too Late To Reserve A Space in The Free Preview Class

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“Sam Christensen, one of L.A.’s best-known image consultants, has spent years helping actors find a personal definition system that they can market to industry professionals. Drawing on his extensive experience as a former casting director and a manager, he considers it his life’s work to help performers pinpoint a public identity that honors both the public’s perception and the complex interior life of the actor.”

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Backstage Magazine 

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T. Schreiber Studio

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151 W. 26th Street Btwn 6th and 7th Ave

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New York, NY 10001   

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 Read more about Sam in Backstage.  Click here to read the article and watch him discuss the Sam Christensen Process. 

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Book It!

*Only 2 Spaces Left!*nProfessional Film Auditioningnwith Ellen Parks

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Audition or Teacher Recommendation Required

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Mondays 7:00-10:00PMnDates: August 1st – August 15th, 2011nFee: $275/3 Classes ($225 w. Scene Study)

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Ellen Parks is returning for one more 3-week workshop this summer! (This class will not be offered again until October/November. ) Ask anyone who has worked with her. Her insights, direction, and practical advice are so empowering to the actor and invaluable to making your film auditions get results. So don’t miss this chance to work with the award-winning Casting Director of Grey Gardens, Sideways, and Flirting with Disaster. Limited space available.

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FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 212-741-0209 OR E-MAIL US AT info@www.tschreiber.org.

“You MUST read this Q & A with Terry Schreiber”

Excerpts from a recent interview by Kelly Calabrese of NYCastings.com.

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Insiders Guide to NY Acting Studios – Spotlight on T. Schreiber Studio with Terry Schreiber

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Posted on: 7/7/2011 2:00:00 PM under Advice

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nnWritten by: Kelly Calabresen

n”I always start with I MUST,” says Terry Schreiber, “because I MUST propels you. ‘I MUST have Juliet tonight or I’ll die.’ And I ask you what that means to you, not just intellectually. What does that mean to you in your body?”nnSince 1969, Terry Schreiber has helped open up actors with his relaxed, safe and supportive atmosphere. The Studio began with Terry Schreiber teaching classes twice a week to twelve actors in a converted loft on the Upper East Side of New York City. Enrollment increased and the group began mounting productions in what were the early beginnings of New York City’s Off-Off Broadway movement and building its reputation of high quality productions and performances. Today, the Studio resides in a renovated multi-use space on the 7th floor of 151 West 26th Street in New York’s lively Chelsea neighborhood. Classes and productions run continuously throughout the year.nnTo help you learn more about T. Schreiber Studio, NYCastings spoke directly with the legendary, passion filled man – Terry Schreiber…n

You MUST read this Q & A with Terry Schreiber

nQ: In your studio, you focus on removing the tension that blocks feelings. How does this help actors?nnIn every class we do relaxation exercises. We differentiate between nervousness and tension because if you’re not nervous when you are about to go on stage – you are not alive. The tension is what gets in the way. We tend to build up guards to protect ourselves from feelings that we don’t want to have. Our exercises will help you to release that without analyzing who you were at what age to block that feeling. That is one thing I am deft on in acting classes is a teacher trying to be a psychologist. We have a class called Body Dynamics and Carol Reynolds is a certified Bioenergetics teacher.n

nSometimes, the areas you have to go to into in acting are very difficult areas to open up to. It gets into some feelings that have been blocked for a while. It’s amazing what happens after that 45 minutes because you are so centered and the concentration is right there and available. It opens up your imagination, your inner life, that organic life that you want to get to.nnI talked to Ed Norton about American History X and asked “How could you say those things to Elliot Gould it had to be very hard,” because Ed is such a liberal person and Ed said it was. The dialogue can be thick in your mouth but you have to get free with the words because the character is.n

nQ: How does being relaxed and centered affect how a person portrays a character?nnNo athlete is going to come out and just play a game. They get to the park hours early and warm up. An actor has got to do the same. You cannot convince me that anyone can come to the theatre at 7:30 and be ready to perform at 8pm. There is just too much going on in our personal lives. Look at someone like Mary-Louise Parker who has her own keys to the stage door and gets there at 5pm. You’ve got to get rid of the day. You can’t just walk out there and be ready to go. You’ve got to be centered in what you are going to do that night. You have to do a gradual warm up and find out where your energy is in your body. Is it high or low? You want to get down to that lower energy.nnQ: How does your technique help actors succeed long term in this biz?nnFor the experienced actor, the actors use it as a gym. They use it as a place to work out, so that the audition is not the be all end all of their career. It is a good opportunity to do the roles they are afraid of, to do writers who have a different rhythm than their own and to stretch. Especially, if they have trouble getting to the things that are called for many times in auditions – the vulnerability or anger. You’ve got to find that in you because you are your own instrument.nnI don’t think you can ever just ‘as if’ yourself through a role without being on top of the role and connected to it. When you see the really good actors they are connected to what they are doing. They aren’t doing just an idea of the role. The inner connection comes from you, that you open up yourself and share that side of you with us. Once you are doing it, the audience thinks you are the character and in the classroom you are opening up to that.nnQ: How does an actor get started with T. Schreiber Studio?nnWe do a big orientation here every Monday night for new people for an hour and a half because we do a presentation and individual interviews…We try to create a very safe environment here so people are comfortable taking risks or chances without judgment. I have no auditing for that reason because I think that is a complete violation. If you have twelve new people in class, every time, it is a performance. I don’t want that. I want you to really explore your work and fall on your butt a couple of times because out of that comes growth. It’s got to be a supportive atmosphere…nnQ: If someone is trained but not in your style, will they start at beginning or intermediate level?nnIt depends on the background. If I am interviewing, or Peter is interviewing, we will ask if you’ve had any Meisner training or Strasberg training with sensory work and physical conditioning. We ask who you have been studying with and what kind of approach did they take because I feel it is very unfair to put an actor in a class over their head. They should feel comfortable yet challenged. As we move along the exercises get more demanding. We try to build through a whole series of exercises where each gives you more courage and freedom. It will still be difficult to jump in but it is about you finding tools that work for you.n

nQ: How does your approach give New York actors an edge at auditions?nnYou have to get into yourself…Sit in the chair and drop over and don’t care if some other actor wonders what you are doing. You’ve got to be willing to do that. There may be people who kid you but you’ve got to laugh it off and go back to what you were doing. It is key.nnQ: What type of person is best suited for your style of training?nnSomebody who is open enough to give themselves to this kind of work and want to explore. Some of the exercises will work for you and some not and that’s ok because you come out with tools.n

nWhen you are really playing an objective your objective plays you and you have to give up control to do that or else you are just up in your head, manipulating it. You are not really taking it on.nnQ: Your Studios seems more like a community than a school with all it’s theatres. Is it?nnYes, it is a family here. We do a three play season, we just finished a couple of weeks ago with our last production for the season, we are doing a bare bones production in July and will open again in October with Lobby Hero.n

nAnd we have a commercial class, a voice over class, Peter Miner who has been with me for years teaches on-camera 1 & 2 so if you’ve never had any experience you can get your feet wet with On-Camera 1…We cover everything that you are going to face out there in the world.n

nQ: If you had to sum up why someone should study at YOUR Studio – what verb, adjective or phrasing would you use?nnI think we are really about providing an open and supporting atmosphere to explore the work, to explore the craft. You can feel safe here. And that’s a very important thing. Some teachers attack, they strip someone’s ego to rebuild them, and I think that’s out the window. They are not a therapist and can leave a person in trouble.nnAfter you do a scene at our Studio, I will ask you where that takes you and you will feel the freedom to share and talk about it. To say it reminds you of a time in high school. I just need a hint of where you are going with the role or what you are trying to get inside or share with yourself. Whatever you are playing it’s got to come back to you and finding that character within you. Sometimes that is very hard, you can be playing someone who is nasty and you can’t judge that character. You’ve got to play it and let the audience do the judging.nnQ: Any advice you have been given that helped you stay inspired?nnWhen I first came to New York I was introduced to Kim Stanley who for me is the greatest actor I’ve ever seen on stage. When I was leaving her house, she took my hands and said, “Just remember, as you go along with your career you may have to sell out on some things but just make sure you can buy them back.” It was a wonderful point about integrity.nnI also believe that it is very important to keep growing. When a young person hits it and then stops there, doesn’t use a class again for a gym, that’s a trap. There is always an opportunity to grow. When you shut off learning and think you know it all that’s when the instrument starts to shut down. Look at the actors you admire, like Meryl Streep, and the risks and the chances they take.n

nThank you to Terry Schreiber for his time and insight!n

 For the Full Interview

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 CLICK HERE

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By Popular Demand…

*Ellen Parks is Back!*

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Professional Film Auditioning  

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with Ellen Parks

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Audition or Teacher Recommendation Required

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Mondays 7:00-10:00PM

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Dates August 1st – August 15th, 2011

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Fee: $275/3 Classes ($225 w. Scene Study) 

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Ellen Parks is returning for one more 3-week workshop this summer! (This class will not be offered again until October/November. ) Ask anyone who has worked with her.  Her insights, direction, and  practical advice are so empowering to the actor and invaluable to making your film auditions get results.  So don’t miss this chance to work with the award-winning Casting Director of Grey Gardens, Sideways, and Flirting with Disaster. Limited space available.

nFOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 212-741-0209 ORn

E-MAIL US AT info@www.tschreiber.org.

Lobby Hero Auditions!

Audition Time Again…

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Lobby HeronbyKenneth LonergannDirected by Peter Jensen

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Please review the information provided on the website and the call-board at the studio. You must sign up for an audition in person.

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DO NOT CALL THE OFFICE TO SIGN UP!

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For sides, breakdowns & schedules click HERE.

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*Auditions are only open to T. Schreiber Studio alumni or current students who have completed 3 months of classes, or the equivalent number of class sessions (12), before the date of the first rehearsal.

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*Sign-up sheets are posted on the audition board at the Studio.nBe certain you can make the audition date before you sign-up, and if necessary, please cancel well in advance.

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*You will need to acquire the play, copies WILL NOT be provided. We will be working from the Dramatists Play Service “Revised Edition.” All page numbers listed refer to this edition (2002).

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You can buy it…nOnline:

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Dramatist Play Service

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Shakespeare and Company

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In store:nDrama Bookshopn250 West 40th StreetnNew York, NY 10018

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Shakespeare and Company Booksellersn716 BroadwaynNew York, NY 10003norn939 LexingtonnNew York, NY 10065

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Auditions:nMonday, July 25thn10am-1pm, 2pm-5pm

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Friday, July 29thn10am-1pm, 2pm-5pm

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Monday, August 1stn10am-1pm, 2pm-5pm

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Callbacks:nSunday, August 7thn12pm – 4pmn(a possible second callback may be held onnMonday August 8th 8pm – 10pm, if needed.)

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Performances:nOct. 13-Nov. 20, 2011nThur.-Sat. @ 8:00pmnSat. @ 2pmnSun. @3pm

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***Please note that we have increased our show schedule. There is also the potential that we might add Wednesday night performances to this schedule as well depending on the theatre’s availability***

Welcome to The Big Country

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The Big CountrynA Workshop Productionnby Chris BarlownDirected by Morgan Gould

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World PremiernJuly 21-30, 2011nThursday-Saturday @ 8pmnSaturday @ 2pm

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Admission: $5 cash, paid at door.nTo reserve a seat email Barb at Theatre@www.tschreiber.org

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Winner of the 2011 New Works Project. The Big Country combines the Great American Play with the Great American PowerPoint Presentation to finally explain those bizarre alien creatures known colloquially as Human Beings.

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Get all the latest Interstellar transmissionsn”Like” Us!nfacebook.com/itsabigcountry

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“Follow” Us!ntwitter.com/austinbabbish

NEED HELP? NEED HELP?